History in Pictures: The New Series Bringing History to Life

In the new History in Pictures series, readers will take a close look at the past. These books go beyond the basics and inform readers how historical events relate to social justice issues today. As part of the Read Woke™ Books collection, these titles were created in partnership with the Read Woke librarian, Cicely Lewis. Lewis created a Read Woke challenge at her school to engage students with what was happening in the world around them. Read Woke Books challenge social norms, give voice to the silenced, and share the perspective from underrepresented groups. Learn more and find free teaching guides here and get an inside look at the History in Pictures series below.

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Addressing Race and Racism with Readers

This week and throughout the coming month, the United States marks several notable anniversaries: The 2nd anniversary of George Floyd’s death on May 25, the 101st anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre on May 30, and Juneteenth on June 19 commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans in Texas.

These events are emblematic of a long and continuing reckoning with racism in the US. While educators, librarians, and parents recognize the importance of discussing these distant and not-so-distant histories with readers of all ages, approaching these topics requires care, nuance, and consideration for students’ own experiences.

Below is a selection of books—both fiction and nonfiction—that offer historical context and provide foundations for discussions about race. We’ve also included links to downloadable teaching guides where available to help further facilitate discussions with readers.

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Gender Inequality in Sports: Guest Post from Author Kirstin Cronn-Mills

I’m not an athlete. No matter how much I enjoy being active, I’m too clumsy for sports. Too uninterested in competition.

But I raised an athlete, and we’re a family who enjoys watching sports of all kinds. An intense amount of dedication and determination goes along with athletic achievement. I know about the time, money, and support it takes to improve your game. I know about both joy and sorrow on the field—my son still carries a particular defeat with him, twelve years after it happened.

My love for athletes helped me write Gender Inequality in Sports—I wanted to champion the strength of women athletes who fight stereotypes and disrespect on top of the work they do for their sport. I want to recognize the perseverance of these competitors and share their stories with young people.

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