New Articles Available NOW on Lerner Sports!

We’ve added even more of your readers’ favorite athletes to our ever-growing collection of profiles on the Lerner Sports Database! Find 60 new athletes biographies, including:

  • Megan Rapinoe
  • Mia Hamm
  • Nastia Liukin
  • Magic Johnson
  • Pele
  • Zion Williamson

and many more! ! If you’re a current Lerner Sports subscriber, start browsing the updated database now. If not, request a free trial to check out these new athletes and more.

Download Our Free Activity Guide!

Seeking fun self-guided activities for readers? Check out our list of Lerner Sports reading challenges, a guide featuring over 20 activities that will have readers exploring every inch of the Lerner Sports database! Activities highlight each sports category in the database and encourage readers to peruse athlete profiles, dig deep into stats, learn new vocabulary, and more!  

DOWNLOAD THE READING CHALLENGES >

Book Tie-Ins

Though many gymnastics fans were disappointed with the postponement of the Summer 2020 Olympics, readers can still get a behind-the-scenes look at the high-flying sport! Check out print books below that make perfect supplements to gymnastics content on the Lerner Sports database. 

US Olympian Aly Raisman is a leader on and off the mat. She is an outspoken voice against sexual assault. Learn about the most fascinating details of her life as a gold-winning gymnast.

Learn what it takes to become a professional gymnast! Readers will get a fascinating insider look at the life of a gymnast, from preparing for competition to events outside the gym.

Q&A with Author Ginger Garrett

We spoke with Ginger Garrett about the inspiration for her new middle-grade novel, Name Tags and Other Sixth-Grade Disasters, which follows twelve-year-old Lizbeth’s quest to make friends, thwart nemeses, and figure out how to express herself through art in time to participate in a mandatory school talent show.

Were you stuck with labels you hated when you were a kid?

I had such a horrible overbite I couldn’t close my mouth all the way. Add that to my freckles and flat reddish hair, and I was a nerd of epic proportions. But that’s not what the kids called me. I would have liked Nerd, actually. They called me Monster. I felt such shame.

As you mentor kids, what have you noticed about the power of labels?

I’ve noticed that in middle school, every kid wants to identify with a group. They want to belong, so it’s natural to accept a label as part of belonging to that group.

I don’t want to discourage the kids I mentor from exploring their identities, but I’ve encouraged them to “leave room on their name tag.” Their whole identity cannot be wrapped up and expressed in one word. For example, they are more than a Jock. Or a Brain.

And most important, no one should ever get to write on their name tag except them. No one gets to decide who we are, except for us.

Art—and a special art teacher—plays such a redemptive role in this story. Are you an artist?

I can’t even draw a straight line. My mom once sent my brother and me to an art camp. He was very talented. We each made clay mice, and his turned out much better than mine. My mom put his mouse on display over her kitchen sink; somehow mine got thrown out. I seethed with jealousy for days until one night, I sneaked out of bed, grabbed his mouse, and snapped its little limbs right off. I only told my mom the truth about it a couple of years ago.

If you were to fill out a name tag right now, what would you write on it?

Goofball. Mom. Dogmom. Yournewbestfriend!! Writer.

Truthfully, there’s a little bit of Lizbeth in me. I really like people and think if we could just get rid of the rotten ones, the planet would be one big party. And then the Universe gently reminds me that on any given day, I might be one of the rotten ones!

Coding Is Definitely a Literacy

This week, SLJ shared in an opinion column that Coding Is a Literacy. “School librarians are especially pivotal in coding literacy because, as with any other language, the age of acquisition for any language matters. Librarians are uniquely placed in schools with students from their early years, long before children have access to computer science electives,” writes IdaMae Craddock, a librarian at the Albemarle (VA) Lab Schools.

We couldn’t agree more. Below is a list of our most popular coding series, many of which contain hands-on coding activities that can be accessed remotely for free, meaning you can do a digital makerspace activity even with distance or hybrid learning.

Sports Coding Concepts

Interest Level: Grade 1 – Grade 3   ·  Reading Level: Grade 1

Introduce readers to computer coding through no-tech, sports-themed projects. Readers will move a soccer ball by writing an algorithm and use loops to create a winning football play. Sports fans will enjoy learning the basics of coding—with no computer needed! Author and elementary school librarian Allyssa Loya designed this series to be intimidation-free for both readers and educators.

Ready, Set, Code!

Interest Level: Grade 2 – Grade 5   ·  Reading Level: Grade 3

Introduce young coders to the most popular coding programs and languages. Step-by-step instructions and clear illustrations guide readers, while fun activities help them apply what they’ve learned.

Kids Get Coding

Interest Level: Grade 1 – Grade 4   ·  Reading Level: Grade 3

What’s an algorithm? How do you fix bugs? What is an app? How do you program a computer game? This series leads students through the basics of computer programming using real-world examples and practical activities.

Mission Code (Alternator Books)

Interest Level: Grade 3 – Grade 6   ·  Reading Level: Grade 4

Dive into the fascinating world of coding languages! These titles walk new programmers through the basics of creating their own code. Hands-on learn-to-code activities accessed through an online Page Plus link add to the fun!

Digital Makers (Alternator Books)

Interest Level: Grade 3 – Grade 6   ·  Reading Level: Grade 4

Learn how to create, launch, perfect, and safely share digital works of art, including videos, songs, blogs, and websites. This series capitalizes on the popularity of both digital technology and makerspace activities. Creator profiles and expert tips provide extra inspiration.

Project Code

Interest Level: Grade 4 – Grade 7   ·  Reading Level: Grade 5

This exciting, makerspace-friendly series offers a variety of step-by-step projects for programming in Scratch. Easy-to-follow instructions guide young programmers through activities that showcase how to code animation, create music, write a story, and design computer games. The projects build essential programming knowledge and skills, preparing kids to take what they’ve learned and apply it to their own Scratch creations.

All of the above books are available in library-bound hardcover and multi-user eBook formats from most school library vendors. If you purchase direct from Lerner, we’re offering a budget-saving special, where you can receive both formats for the price of just the eBook. Learn more here!