Unspeakable: A Visit to Tulsa’s Black Wall Street

In April 2019, editorial director Carol Hinz and art director Danielle Carnito traveled to Oklahoma to gather information related to several books they were working on. One of them was Unspeakable: The Tulsa Race Massacre by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Floyd Cooper, which will release on February 2, 2021. We asked Carol and Danielle to share a little about how their trip shaped their work on this book.

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5 Kinds of Nonfiction: Nonfiction Writers Dig Deep

A guest post by Melissa Stewart

Many teachers and students seem to think that writing nonfiction requires nothing more than doing some research and cobbling together a bunch of facts, but nothing could be further from the truth. To dispel this alarming myth, fifty of today’s most celebrated authors for children have come together to share a critical part of the nonfiction writing process that often goes unseen. The result is the illuminating anthology Nonfiction Writers Dig Deep: 50 Award-winning Children’s Book Authors Share the Secret of Engaging Writing

To craft high-quality prose, nonfiction writers have to dig deep. They have to get in touch with their passions and their vulnerabilities and use them to fuel their work. Each book has a piece of the author at its heart, and that personal connection is what drives writers to keep working, despite the inevitable obstacles and setbacks.

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5 Kinds of Nonfiction: Sara Levine

We explore Expository Literature with Sara Levine, author of Eye by Eye: Comparing How Animals See. The playful picture book keeps readers guessing as they learn wonderfully weird and gross facts and find out how different animal’s eyes are like—and unlike—those of starfish, owls, slugs, and more! Keep reading to learn more about Sara’s process, and about Expository Literature and the 5 Kinds of Nonfiction.

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Introducing: 5 Kinds of Nonfiction with Melissa Stewart!

A guest post by Melissa Stewart

Back in 2017, I proposed a five-category system for classifying children’s nonfiction on my blog, and the response was incredible. Teachers loved it. So did librarians and children’s book authors and editors. People praised the clarity it brought to the range of children’s nonfiction available today.

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